Life Data Labs, Inc.

Hoof Canker

Hoof Canker

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We gratefully appreciate the following case study submitted by:
Ms. Dr med vet I.Schweikardt


Canker of the hoof

Canker of the hoof is a cauliflower-like growth on the corium, the frog and the adjoining parts of the hoof. Biopsies of the diseased tissue show that the damage is the result of an infectious inflammation of the corium that is caused by gram negative anaerobic bacteria in the germ layer of the uppermost layer of the skin (epidermis). Mostly it seems that the horn-producing cells are less affected than the inter-tubular horn. From this a mass of isolated horn beads result that are surrounded by a cheese-like, white mass of pus. Because this infection affects the deepest layers of the skin, the prognosis is difficult, time-consuming and expensive.
The causes are still unclear. It is assumed that in many cases a long duration of thrush can lead to a degeneration of the cells. Observations have been made that canker of the frog occurs more frequently in certain breeds of horses (cold-blooded heavy types of horses). Also the care and feeding of the horse plays a great role



Therapy

The treatment of canker of the frog is very difficult, requires a great deal of time and does not always lead to complete recovery. The 12-year-old thoroughbred gelding shown on the photos was used as a therapy horse for handicapped children before the cancer set in. It was kept in a group in open boxes whereby the feed was restricted to pure oats (concentrated feed). Hay was always available. Its exercising area and box were mucked out and cleaned every day.

 

The change of feed

The change of feed began slowly the day the horse arrived. It was changed from pure oat feed (3 kg a day) to a muesli ( 1.5 kg a day) and parallel to this was slowly put onto Farrier's Formula®, increasing the amount slowly within 14 days so that the horse was then being given 1.5 measuring cups per day.

 

Considered incurable

The horse came to us in the summer of 2006 after completion of treatment and was considered as incurable. When admitted the horse showed a severe contraction of the toes on one of the front hoofs. This was causing the bulb to be displaced upwards. The hoof that was decaying as a result of the canker of the frog showed changes in the frog at the bars and the side wall. This side wall had a cleft in the horn with a distinct change in the layer of lamellae. As the horse was shod at the time, the shoes were removed as part of the preliminary treatment. This is important in order to activate the hoof mechanism as well as possible. Most farriers work with closed shoe (temporary or cover shoes?) as heavy bleeding can occur and these shoes produce more pressure on the sole. If at all possible we work without closed shoe only with bandages that are changed daily. All hoofs were abraded and corrected as well as possible at intervals of four weeks. The affected leg was treated as follows under a local anaesthetic (as the treatment is very painful):


Start of the canker treatment

The right leg was bandaged above the pastern as a lot of blood is involved in the canker treatment. During the first stage the changes in the horn on the frog, on the bars and the side wall were cut away to the required depth. 4 further treatments followed at intervals of four weeks whereby the decayed tissue was cut away deeply as far as the healthy horn.


Second operation

During the 2nd operation almost the whole of the side wall was removed as the change in cells was apparent in the side wall.

 
Medication therapy

The bandage was changed every day under as sterile conditions as possible. Apart from correct feeding rinsing with iodine form ether and subsequent treatment with hoof canker powder on the affected parts including special cotton wool (Liegasano) is imperative during treatment. After the operations described above the horse was given a six-day antibiotic course and painkillers as required.



Rapid improvement in the hoof quality


Healthy hoof by October 2006

The horse was healthy by October 2006 and was discharged as cured.

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

canker

 

We gratefully appreciate the following case study submitted by:
Ms. Dr med vet I.Schweikardt


Canker of the hoof

Canker of the hoof is a cauliflower-like growth on the corium, the frog and the adjoining parts of the hoof. Biopsies of the diseased tissue show that the damage is the result of an infectious inflammation of the corium that is caused by gram negative anaerobic bacteria in the germ layer of the uppermost layer of the skin (epidermis). Mostly it seems that the horn-producing cells are less affected than the inter-tubular horn. From this a mass of isolated horn beads result that are surrounded by a cheese-like, white mass of pus. Because this infection affects the deepest layers of the skin, the prognosis is difficult, time-consuming and expensive.
The causes are still unclear. It is assumed that in many cases a long duration of thrush can lead to a degeneration of the cells. Observations have been made that canker of the frog occurs more frequently in certain breeds of horses (cold-blooded heavy types of horses). Also the care and feeding of the horse plays a great role

 

 

 

 


Therapy

The treatment of canker of the frog is very difficult, requires a great deal of time and does not always lead to complete recovery. The 12-year-old thoroughbred gelding shown on the photos was used as a therapy horse for handicapped children before the cancer set in. It was kept in a group in open boxes whereby the feed was restricted to pure oats (concentrated feed). Hay was always available. Its exercising area and box were mucked out and cleaned every day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The change of feed

The change of feed began slowly the day the horse arrived. It was changed from pure oat feed (3 kg a day) to a muesli ( 1.5 kg a day) and parallel to this was slowly put onto Farrier's Formula®, increasing the amount slowly within 14 days so that the horse was then being given 1.5 measuring cups per day.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Considered incurable

The horse came to us in the summer of 2006 after completion of treatment and was considered as incurable. When admitted the horse showed a severe contraction of the toes on one of the front hoofs. This was causing the bulb to be displaced upwards. The hoof that was decaying as a result of the canker of the frog showed changes in the frog at the bars and the side wall. This side wall had a cleft in the horn with a distinct change in the layer of lamellae. As the horse was shod at the time, the shoes were removed as part of the preliminary treatment. This is important in order to activate the hoof mechanism as well as possible. Most farriers work with closed shoe (temporary or cover shoes?) as heavy bleeding can occur and these shoes produce more pressure on the sole. If at all possible we work without closed shoe only with bandages that are changed daily. All hoofs were abraded and corrected as well as possible at intervals of four weeks. The affected leg was treated as follows under a local anaesthetic (as the treatment is very painful):

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Start of the canker treatment

The right leg was bandaged above the pastern as a lot of blood is involved in the canker treatment. During the first stage the changes in the horn on the frog, on the bars and the side wall were cut away to the required depth. 4 further treatments followed at intervals of four weeks whereby the decayed tissue was cut away deeply as far as the healthy horn.

 

 

 

 


Second operation

During the 2nd operation almost the whole of the side wall was removed as the change in cells was apparent in the side wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Medication therapy

The bandage was changed every day under as sterile conditions as possible. Apart from correct feeding rinsing with iodine form ether and subsequent treatment with hoof canker powder on the affected parts including special cotton wool (Liegasano) is imperative during treatment. After the operations described above the horse was given a six-day antibiotic course and painkillers as required.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 



Rapid improvement in the hoof quality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Healthy hoof by October 2006

The horse was healthy by October 2006 and was discharged as cured.

 

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Cherokee, AL
35616
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of the USA

Phone:
+1 256 370 7555
Fax:
+1 256 370 7509
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12290 Hwy 72
Cherokee, Alabama
35616
Product of the USA


Phone: +1 256 370 7555
Fax: +1 256 370 7509
This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.